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Highland visual arts and crafts award

This week I finally received delivery of a new Rubi stone cutting machine with the help of Highlife Highland, Creative Scotland and XpoNorth who were responsible for awarding me partial funding so that I could explore the properties of my local stone. I have spent a year developing commercial jewellery using Caithness stone which has been very well received locally, and now I want to create more contemporary, experimental work. This is my first few slices of stone from an inland quarry near my parents home.

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